New York needs comprehensive campaign finance reform more than ever, to restore the public’s trust in honest, open, and efficient government. A small donor match system will put the needs of real voters — the business owners and workers who drive New York’s economy — back on the agenda.

Latest New York News

Big Money vs. Us

On her podcast “Sunday Civics,” Brooklyn NAACP President L. Joy Williams speaks with Lawrence Norden of the Brennan Center for Justice about the role of money in politics.  The two discuss the outsized influence of big donors on the political process and how that influence changes the priorities of lawmakers.  According to Norden, public financing of elections is the “number one most important thing we can do” to reverse this problem in New York State and across the country. Source: Sunday Civics Date: April 14, 2019 See full story here.

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A small-donor matching public campaign finance system is in reach in New York (Op-Ed)

New York took a step toward comprehensive campaign finance reform in this year’s budget by establishing a binding commission to design a small donor public financing system for state elections.  Vigilant attention on this commission from policymakers, the press, and New Yorkers will be essential to creating a good policy by the December 2019 deadline.  As Lawrence Norden and Chisun Lee of the Brennan Center for Justice note, “If we hold our leaders to their promises, we should have a robust small-donor match system before the year is out. This would make New York a national model of democracy that works for everyone, not just for a few wealthy special interests.” Source: New York Daily News Date: April 8, 2019 See full article here.

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Wisconsin should address damage done by big money from outside interests (Editorial)

Following the April 2 election in Wisconsin, the Capital Times editorial board urges the state’s elected officials to consider passing public financing to resolve the state’s big donor problem.  The editorial board notes, “Wealthy and powerful interests waded into every competition that interested them, bringing outside money to bear on contests that would have been better without the conflicted cash.” The board encourages lawmakers to consider the widespread support for small donor public financing in New York, as evidenced by the broad array of organizations that came together in the Fair Elections for New York coalition to advocate for the reform. Source: Capital Times Date: April 1, 2019 See full story here.

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Latest National News

Portland, Maine activists look to create a local clean elections program

Activists in Portland, Maine are pushing for public financing for local elections in their city.  Representatives from the Fair Elections Portland campaign have begun the process to get an initiative on the November ballot to create a clean elections program.  If enacted, this program “would allow candidates for municipal office to receive an allocation from the general fund, which is funded through property taxes, to finance their campaigns, and would likely be modeled after the same program used by gubernatorial and state legislative candidates.” Source: Portland Press Herald Date: April 15, 2019 See full story here.

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Wisconsin should address damage done by big money from outside interests (Editorial)

Following the April 2 election in Wisconsin, the Capital Times editorial board urges the state’s elected officials to consider passing public financing to resolve the state’s big donor problem.  The editorial board notes, “Wealthy and powerful interests waded into every competition that interested them, bringing outside money to bear on contests that would have been better without the conflicted cash.” The board encourages lawmakers to consider the widespread support for small donor public financing in New York, as evidenced by the broad array of organizations that came together in the Fair Elections for New York coalition to advocate for the reform. Source: Capital Times Date: April 1, 2019 See full story here.

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